A Really Good Question

One of my readers asked me a question that you may have wondered yourself. He wrote:

“You have so much phenomenal and inspiring information. I don’t expect absolute perfection in everything you say. But when I really start trusting someone and I come across something that doesn’t make sense or that I don’t agree with, I’m very confused. I don’t know if I’m just not grasping what is being said or if it’s actually incorrect (at least for me). I’m a very literal and analytical person. So I have a hard time just skipping over these things.

“In your book, Hidden Treasures: Heaven’s Astonishing Help with Your Money Matters, you say ‘If something is a little bit bad, then it is only a little bit good. If something is catastrophic, then there is, within it, something phenomenal!’ Using the logic you used to build up to that statement, the opposite would also be true. If something is phenomenal, then there is, within it, something catastrophic.

“I have known people who have become very soured by this kind of outlook. They would see something bad in everything good. Therefore, they ceased trying to attain anything good. I don’t think I’m that way, but I can have that tendency at times. So I’m just trying to understand what you’re saying.” – Don

My reply:

“Yes, you can find bad wherever you look for it, too. It comes down to choice. But the message in my book is to assure people that there IS good to be found, when by nature we aren’t really sure.

“This concept is based on the idea that each situation just ‘is’ what it is, and both good and bad can potentially come from it. By our choice, we see the side of it and benefit from the side of it we want. The point of this concept is to help us believe that no matter how bad something appears to be, there is good that CAN come from it, to help us begin THINKing along those lines.

“It would be foolish to see something “good” and then go looking for the bad that can come from it. We’ll surely find whatever we’re looking for. But just because there is bad that CAN come from it, it doesn’t mean that it will, so it’s wiser to focus on the good that can come from it instead. Just like – just because there is good that CAN come from it, doesn’t mean that it will – so we should do our part to look for and expect the good.”

Perhaps this explanation will help other readers who have wondered the same thing. Thanks for your question, Don!

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Got a Dilemma?

Positive Thinking Tip: Keep it Simple – and Trust the Process

Got a dilemma? What if you had absolute confidence, knowing exactly what to do next?

The hardest work you’ll ever do takes place inside your own mind. It’s the hardest work in the world, and most people will do anything they can to avoid it.

But when you know how to get your mind in a ready-state for inspired ideas, then you more easily recognize them when they come, and you learn to trust them to help you find the shortest distance between your dilemma and its resolution.

This is a very simple process, but it can be tough to do because it requires mental discipline.

How To Do It

  1. Picture what you want – see the outcome as though it has already happened. Literally take the time to put the image(s) on the screen of your mind and hold them there until you can…
  2. Create the emotional experience – allow yourself to answer the question, “how would it actually FEEL to have this dilemma solved?”
  3. Get to work solving the problem to the best of your ability, trusting that you are being guided by your higher power to achieve the success you envisioned.
  4. Never allow yourself to think for longer than a split second, “I’m not sure if this is actually working…”  You must CHOOSE to believe until the goal is achieved.  Believe that there is unseen help orchestrating all things necessary for your success.  As long as you believe it’s there and working for your good, you’ll qualify for the help.

Most people get stuck because they do step 1 and 2, but fail to do step 3 long enough because they allow doubt or discouragement to take over.

A lot of people get stuck because they fail to take step 1 and 2 seriously enough.  It requires a space – a positive environment and time to do the mental work.

That’s what we give you at Genius Bootcamp: the environment, the guidance, the time, and the space to do the work.

Do I make people do push-ups and bark at them if they don’t do them fast enough?

Well, I know, I do seem like the type of person to run things that way, don’t I? LOL

No, but the fact is, as Bertrand Russell put it, “Most people would rather die than think; [in fact], many do.”

Or as Henry Ford stated, “Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is… why so few engage in it.”

Wallace Wattles said, “There is no labor which most people shrink as they do from that of sustained and consecutive thought.”

So, what happens at a Genius Bootcamp?

You THINK – and you think a LOT.

From this thinking in a certain way – which I coach you through, in a relatively small group setting – you will discover genius ideas.

In fact, while you’re at my bootcamp, you’ll wish you were doing push-ups instead!

But you’ll be glad you came. You’ll thank me for putting your brain to work like this, and you’ll take with you a skill that you’ll be able to use time and time again throughout your life.

Did you know?

There are people on the planet who are paid to just sit and think – and they are paid well for it – because they have learned how to tap into genius ideas, in the same way that I’ll show you how to find (and trust) the solutions to your own dilemmas.

Remember, the solution to every problem is only an idea away.

However, so often we remain stuck because we can’t seem to think of that one brilliant idea that tries to get our attention, oh so quietly.

When you go to a Genius Bootcamp, you MUST bring with you at least one perplexing dilemma. That’s the only pre-requisite.

Got a dilemma?

Perfect. That’s all you need to bring!

The next TEN people to sign up will save a whopping 80% off the regular ticket price!

The Bootcamp wakes you up and helps you see your dilemma from a whole new perspective… and from that ten-thousand-foot level, you begin to recognize your hidden resources, and just how to arrange them for your ultimate victory.

Victory is won in those single, shining moments when you make a quality decision in the face of apparent disaster.

This 2-day event will give you the environment, the information, the mental exercises, strategies, battle plans, and support to claim your victory NOW and return with extraordinary confidence to the battle field of Life where your decided win can play out.

Based on the principles contained in the Jackrabbit Factor sequel, Portal to Genius, The Genius Bootcampwill help you tap into those sparks of ideas that have the power to transform your life forever.

Join me for my 2-day Genius Bootcamp for an experience you’ll never forget with do-it-now, get it done application of the principles of success.

You’ll come away feeling like you’ve been str-e-e-tched and SHOT into the stratosphere, like a rubber band off of a toy gun!

It will be fun, enlightening, encouraging, and even mind-blowing. Bring a friend or family member!

You know the principles of success work – you’ve seen it happen. Maybe you look back at times in your life when things were really popping for you. But how do you get back in the groove on purpose? What if your old habits are getting in the way and sabotaging your every effort?

You’re on the front lines of an all-out war against mediocrity and it’s time to toughen you up for victory!

Click here to check the dates and get registered!

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What are You Thinking?

A Book Worth reading: What are you thinking?

The buzz around What Are You Thinking, the 36 page fully-illustrated children’s book published by ThoughtsAlive Books continues to gain momentum!

This one’s a KEEPER!

Here’s what our readers have to say:

That is an awesome book.  Thanks for sharing.  I will definitely buy one, or two, or more.  Thanks again.  Stephanie Chavez

Your sister read my mind. We bought our kids the 7 Habits Kids book a while back and they LOVED it and I was thinking that someone needed to write a kids’ version of the Jackrabbit factor. I can’t wait to get it in the mail. Tell her thanks a TON!!! (oh and the hidden rabbits is perfect too because finding the hidden worm was my kids favorite part of the 7 Habits book). Thanks, Tammy

Just ordered your sister’s book, can’t wait to read it to my kids! ;o) Thanks for sharing. Amanda van der Gulik, TeachingChildrenAboutMoney.com

Tell your sister: What a great book! I love the artwork too! Deric Glissmeyer, UtahKernels.com

Thank you for sharing. It looks great and I want to get a book for school. The artwork looks very appealing to children for learning the concepts. Keep up the good work! — Patti Hulet, Arizona Teacher of the Year 2007

I LOVE this book!  If you want to introduce your children to the Law of Attraction in a fun and whimsical way, you need this in your library. 

Written by my sister Valerie Ackley, and illustrated by one of our very own FTMF participants, Lori Nawyn, it’s a fun follow-up especially for parents who loved The Jackrabbit Factor.

To view sample pages and to place an order, visit http://www.whatareyouthinkingbook.com.  Look for the hidden rabbits while you’re at it!

I LOVE IT! Take a look!

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For Working Moms

positive Thinking tip: too busy for your kids? there’s something even better (and easier) than a sincere, heartfelt apology.

Are you a Mom who helps with the family finances?

Do you feel guilty for not being 100% attentive to your children?

That’s how I felt for many, many years.

I didn’t realize that I was doing damage in a way I had never considered, simply by the way I thought about my situation.

All the time that I felt frustrated and angry about having to work, I wanted my children to grow up believing that our situation was NOT the standard.  I wanted them to believe that mothers should be 100% attentive to their children.  I wanted them to grow up expecting things to be more “ideal” in their future families.

I’d say things like, “I’m so sorry I have to work so much!  I really should be spending time with you, and I promise, we’re doing all we can to fix the problem!”

Or, “I wish I didn’t have to work!  I hate the way things are, but we’ve just got to keep hoping that things will get better.  We have to be patient; can you hang on just a little longer until things can be better?  I really believe this won’t last forever…”

My intentions were good, but what I was really communicating was doing more damage than I realized.

1) I was teaching my kids that my husband and I were doing something wrong, when in reality, we were doing precisely what was necessary.

2) I was teaching my kids that it was acceptable to complain about doing what was necessary. I realized my error when I noticed them complaining about their necessary work, and expecting things to be easier for them, too. For example, they complained about having to walk to school because I was too busy to drive them a measly 1/2 mile in beautiful Arizona weather.  They complained about having to cook, clean and do dishes because I was too busy to do my “regular motherly duties”.

3) It became easy for my kids to conclude that Mom and Dad just don’t keep their promises when the need for me to work stretched from months into years.  I believe our children had a harder time believing the things we said because of it.

4) The “guilty Mom” syndrome caused me to overcompensate in other areas. If they begged for more privileges (even privileges that contradicted family policy or went against plain good sense), I was more likely to give in, just because I felt guilty about working too much. (My friend Matt Reichmann who works for LAPD and sees plenty of domestic dysfunction says there’s nothing more dangerous than a guilty parent.)

One of the best shifts I’ve ever made in my life was the day I decided to stop apologizing for working.

Yes, I still thought it would have been more ideal for our family if I had been able to give more time to my children, but under the circumstances, the next best thing I could do for them was to change the way I felt about it:

I decided to accept my situation and make the most of it.  Instead of saying, “I’m so sorry for working so much; I wish I didn’t have to…”  I started saying things like, “Hey, this is what needs to be done, and you know, it feels really good to work!” Or, “Hey, let’s both get some work done, and at 4:30, let’s go to the park!  What would YOU like to accomplish?”

The energy in our home shifted in an incredible way.  We also decided to make our children more involved in our work, and help them see the impact that it had in the lives of others.

We showed them how doing their chores and helping the family run more smoothly (picking up the slack where Mom couldn’t do it all), was actually helping people all over the world have better lives.  We helped them see the bigger picture, and they started doing family chores more cheerfully.  They even started doing what needed to be done without being asked.

My children are incredibly independent.  They became that way because they had to be.  But I have no regrets – they are learning how to work, and how to feel good about a job well done.

This family is certainly not perfect, and my kids still complain just like anyone else’s kids, but every one of my children has had at least one wonderful moment when they made that shift, and expressed great satisfaction from being independently productive.  It only takes a few of those successes for a child to have a memorable comparison between how they feel when they’re cheerfully productive and how they feel when they are not.

I’d say it’s the Law of Polarity in action: what I thought was so horrible (me working) has turned into a tremendous blessing in our family – but only because I first decided to stop apologizing.

No matter what your work is, it’s helping someone.  Talk to your children about what you do, and the difference it makes in the lives of others.  Teach them by your example to learn how to enjoy being productive.  This is one of the greatest gifts you can give them before they leave the home: a love of work, and an acceptance of what “is”.

(Accepting what “is”, is the first step toward major transformation.  Test it!)

Do you see how children learn from our examples, whether we work or we don’t?  Teach them to find joy in making a contribution when necessary.  Teach them by your example to accept the things they cannot change, and find happiness, no matter what.

If you don’t have to work, I hope you’ll still find work to do – a hobby, a project, community service, whatever – so that your children can learn these lessons.  It’s worth it!

See, no matter how well you parent them, they will face challenges in their adult life.  How well they turn out will have less to do with whether you worked or you didn’t, but more with how they saw you to respond to your challenges.

For more on this topic, read Portal to Genius.

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