It’s Happy Mother’s Day, So you Have to Be Happy

Psalms 127:3-5 “Children are an heritage of the Lord… Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them.”

I was the youngest of four children so there was never a baby sibling for me to tend. My family moved to Asia for a few years and because of our sheltered expatriate experience, I only had the opportunity to baby sit once until we returned to the States.

Unfortunately, by the time we settled in to our new home, I had lost interest and can count on one hand all the times I was employed to watch someone else’s children.

Nevertheless, I still looked forward to motherhood. I knew that, according to all my church lessons growing up, I would find my greatest joys in raising a family.

I married when I was twenty and had my first baby when I was twenty-one. We weren’t fortunate enough to have immediate family close by, so we navigated the jungles of our new parenthood pretty much on our own. I never realized it could be so tough.

Naturally, I had a hard time adjusting to the demands of caring for a new baby; after all, I had scarcely ever cared for a toddler. I’m convinced that there was never a person more UNprepared for motherhood as I. Never had I been required to think more of someone else’s needs than my own for such an extended (um…eternal) period of time. I was overwhelmed and felt as though I was losing my identity.

Ironically, I got pretty good at handling one child just in time for a second one to arrive. It seemed that as our family grew, I learned to manage the number of children I had, just as our numbers increased again by one. With the arrival of a new baby, life was back to mayhem all over again for approximately two years until I learned to handle the new responsibility of yet another child.

For any woman who has reared at least one child, or who has ever babysat a handful of active youngsters, she knows that getting six children ready for church in the morning could be a real challenge; especially when all but the baby are still in Primary.

One morning was particularly frustrating because it was Mother’s Day and I wasn’t feeling very good about how the day was going. I tried not to expect too much special treatment, just in case it didn’t happen. After all, I knew that the children were too young to understand that I honestly didn’t want a picture for the fridge or a weed-flower from the yard; all I wanted was for them to do the things they were supposed to do, without my nagging. For Mother’s Day, couldn’t the house be orderly and the dishes done and breakfast made without me, for one measley day out of the year?

I’m sure my husband made breakfast and did his best to make the morning special. But in spite of it all, I found myself having a pity party that things weren’t absolutely perfect, nor would they ever be. To think that this was just the way it was going to be, probably FOREVER, was terribly discouraging and I moped around, banging cupboard doors and griping at anyone in my path.

Somehow we managed to get everyone out the door and in the car for church, probably ten minutes behind our preferred departure time. I breathed deeply, trying to shake the negativity and prepare myself for sacrament meeting.

Then there came a little four year-old voice from behind. Everyone had been pretty silent, trying not to set me off further, so this tender voice was clearly heard by everyone in the car.

“It’s Happy Mother’s day, Mom… so… you have to be happy.”

I smiled, looked at my husband, and we both started to chuckle. Then my tears flowed.

So it was. It was Happy Mother’s day, and here I was a mother. By mere virtue of
the calling, I should be happy. Hearing my son’s hopeful reminder instantly softened my heart and I finally began once again to feel the joy which was always meant to accompany my role. Happiness was not meant to come through having a perfectly orderly home, at least during the early years. I was reminded of a wooden sign in a friend’s home which said, “Cleaning the house while the kids are still growing is like shoveling the walk while it’s still snowing” (Author unknown).

Another reminder comes from this wonderful poem:

Mother, O Mother, come shake out your cloth,
Empty the dustpan, poison the moth,
Hang out the washing, make up the bed,
Sew on a button and butter the bread.
Where is the mother whose house is so shocking?
She’s up in the nursery, blissfully rocking.
Oh, I’ve grown as shiftless as Little Boy Blue,Lullaby, rockabye, lullaby loo.
Dishes are waiting and bills are past due
Pat-a-cake, darling, and peek, peek-a-boo
The shopping’s not done and there’s nothing for stew
And out in the yard there’s a hullabaloo
But I’m playing Kanga and this is my Roo
Look! Aren’t his eyes the most wonderful hue?
Lullaby, rockaby lullaby loo.
The cleaning and scrubbing can wait till tomorrow
But children grow up as I’ve learned to my sorrow.
So quiet down cobwebs; Dust go to sleep!
I’m rocking my baby and babies don’t keep.
– Ruth Hulbert Hamilton

Joy does not come from an orderly home so much as it should come through the sweet and tender relationships with my family members. Through my little boy’s words, I was reminded that motherhood is truly synonymous with happiness, when I am able to just relax and take time to smell their precious gifts of Mother’s Day flowers and enjoy their homemade pictures on the fridge.

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How to Prosper with a Disbelieving Partner

One of the most common questions I get is on how to achieve goals when your partner in business or your spouse does not think the same way as you about these principles. I’ll continue to address this issue occasionally, because there are so many angles to consider, and maybe this is the one that will make a difference for you.

I’ll be quick to get to the point.

In order for you and your spouse to have the synergy you’d like to have on your way to achieving your prosperity goals, you need to have a COMMON GOAL.

I don’t mean to sound too simplistic here, but that’s what it boils down to. If you can’t understand why you aren’t getting the support you’d like to have, then ask yourself, when was the last time you sat down together and talked about what you’d like your future together to look like? Where do you see the two of you in ten years?

Maybe your spouse has lost his/her dream, and is too discouraged to think beyond the here and now. If your dreams are too grandiose for him/her to believe, then take some time to dream with him/her about the things that you can both be excited about, even if they aren’t much of a stretch. For example, daydream together about being grandparents or great grandparents. Talk about a movie you both enjoyed. Talk about the beliefs you share in common.

The more you share with each other, the more you will be “on the same page” in general. If you dream of traveling the world, and your spouse only gets more depressed when s/he hears you talk about it, because it feels impossible to him/her, then keep those dreams to yourself while they take root. Discuss them if you’re encouraged and supported when you do, but if that isn’t what happens, then talk about the common goals to strengthen your relationship and wait for a better season to talk about the bigger things.

Getting it together – in essence, if you are arguing about stuff, it means you’re simply on different frequencies. You need to build a dream together if you want to have harmonic thoughts.

If you spend time with the same mental images, you’ll end up with the same kinds of emotions. That’s “getting it together” and it can begin with taking in images of a more ideal life, together.

Together, watch movies of people who have exemplary lives and enjoy prosperity. Read books about remarkable people, together, so you can talk about them with each other. Get the images in sync that you both are putting into your minds, and eventually your frequencies will more closely match. A small step in this direction makes a big difference. It doesn’t even have to be self-help material… it just needs to be representations of lives that are on a higher plane than where you may be now. Sometimes it’s easier to find this sort of thing in old movies, like “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.”

One final point: A journal is a wonderful place to express and put detail to your dreams when you don’t have someone to talk about them with. It’s more than that, though. It’s the first step to effectively preparing yourself for inspiration on how to achieve it. To understand why, watch the 4-minute movie.

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Turning Your Ideas into Cash

tyh-lesliehouseholderA Book Worth Reading: Trust Your Heart: Transform Your ideas into income

Do you have an idea spinning inside your brain, but wonder if it could ever really make any money?

You’re not alone.  Thousands of folks have done it – really turned their ideas into cash.  But it’s kind of a miracle, right?  I mean, these folks just got lucky breaks.  Surely.

Trust Your Heart: Turn Your Ideas into Income, the new book from IdeaMarketers.com showcases 19 very different individuals who once sat in the same spot you are.  Wanting to develop an idea and market it, but just wondering how.

The publisher, Marnie Pehrson, called to ask if I would write a chapter for her book some time ago.  My chapter is called “Confessions of a Best-Selling Author” and tells a little of how I took an outrageous dream, turned it into reality, and then had to adjust to some unexpected “side effects”.

This hot-off-the-press book reveals the stories behind real internet successes and shares how these individuals made their dreams come true.

After reading, I guarantee you’ll be inspired to get moving forward on your idea.  The truth is, anyone with the right formula can make their dreams reality.  Take a look at the blueprints these folks used to do just that.

Here’s where you can get a copy of Trust Your Heart: Turn Your Ideas into Income, along with audio interviews from the contributors and your own web publicity package!

Get “Trust Your Heart: Turn Your Ideas into Income” HERE

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